Designer
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Hop

A company I interviewed with gave me a design prompt -- Teleportation is real and the way you teleport is through an app. Over a few hours, design that app :)

Best. Design Challenge. Ever.

Hop is the name of my fictional teleportation app. I worked on it for around 5 hours.

 In this fictional future, teleportation wouldn't be free. It wouldn't be a governmental service, but an entire industry with competition.  Our current world runs on curation. With the internet and the ability for anyone to produce content, curation is the layer on top that tells us what music to listen to, what food to eat, what shows to watch, and what articles to read. If you can go anywhere, you need someone to tell you where to go.

In this fictional future, teleportation wouldn't be free. It wouldn't be a governmental service, but an entire industry with competition.

Our current world runs on curation. With the internet and the ability for anyone to produce content, curation is the layer on top that tells us what music to listen to, what food to eat, what shows to watch, and what articles to read. If you can go anywhere, you need someone to tell you where to go.

Exploration

Exploration

I decided that publications and editorial content, along with trending/popular destinations, would be the best way to get the right destinations to people.

We'd partner with blogs like Eater, Foursquare, and Thrillist, who'd create constantly-fresh lists of places. "The 20 Best Views in the World", "3 Star Michelin Restaurants Only", etc.

I focused on 5 distinct categories: Landmarks, Nature, Cuisine, Shopping, and Entertainment.

Only the best of the best would survive in this world. There'd be no such thing as a bad restaurant, a lackluster shopping experience, or a boring use of your time.

Finally, a toggle at the top lets you switch between destinations that are trending now and popular over all-time.

Home

Home

Designing a teleportation app means designing an app for billions of people.

Figuring out people's use cases is difficult. I asked people in the cafe I work out of, and came to the conclusion that mainly, people will want to hop home, to their work, and to their friends/family's locations.

The idea of "people as places" intrigued me, so I let users create lists of people they frequently hop to, while also letting them subscribe to publication's lists.

A "speed dial" let them hop to a few favorites, and a recently visited section showed their most recent destinations.

*note: the "lists" design was heavily inspired by Jeremiah Shaw's Dropbox Photos design seen here

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Place Page

Place Page

Okay, how the hell do you design a "place" page that can scale to any kind of place, from a restaurant to a person's house to the Pyramids of Giza, and everything in between?

Components. I designed these pages to have the same general layout, but have different components that can be dropped in and swapped out as needed. A restaurant has hours of operation, but a forest doesn't.

A few things that are standard: an image, the local time (can you imagine how much worse "hop lag" would be than jet lag?!), the local weather, and the name.

"Surge Pricing" was a fun half-joke, half-great idea I had. Since crowds suck, costs could increase for places that are too busy, and decrease for a restaurant that wants visitors. Places could even pay for you to come visit them.

A sliding UX ensures you never accidentally hop somewhere or pay without wanting to.

 How do you know what you're hopping into? If anyone can be anywhere at any time, everywhere will be crowded. Through an integration with Snapchat, we'd have a feature called "Peek" where you can see current stories/snaps being posted at any location.  A reviews section shows what people think of the place.  Since there's no longer a concept of "nearby", you don't need to go to a close bar after dinner. The grand canyon might go well with a lighthouse in Maine, or a brewery in San Diego.

How do you know what you're hopping into? If anyone can be anywhere at any time, everywhere will be crowded. Through an integration with Snapchat, we'd have a feature called "Peek" where you can see current stories/snaps being posted at any location.

A reviews section shows what people think of the place.

Since there's no longer a concept of "nearby", you don't need to go to a close bar after dinner. The grand canyon might go well with a lighthouse in Maine, or a brewery in San Diego.

Private Places

Private Places

How does privacy and security work in a post-teleportation world? What's stopping me from teleporting a person out of prison, or teleporting into someone's house without their consent?

Private Places is the answer. A place can designate themselves as private, control access (let a handyman in for one hour a week, a friend in anytime, and an ex-girlfriend in never). Invite a friend over and they can hop instantly.

I figured the service would allow you to buy unlimited access to certain frequent places, so you could hop anytime without cost.

Alert Modal

Alert Modal

The combination of spending real money and the potential for danger meant the app had to be very clear what would happen and when.

Request to Hop

Request to Hop

What it looks like when a friend wants to come over, with full control over their current and future access